TamaraRosier Let’s talk about Leadership!

Dear ACO members,

I am delighted to have the opportunity to serve ACO as President-Elect, and then as President. In addition to other board responsibilities, much of my time has been spent learning the history and workings of ACO, as well as developing new path for the future
of it.

Leadership
Leaders, in general, are important to organizations for three basic reasons:

  • They are responsible for the effectiveness of organizations.
  • They provide a steadiness and guiding purpose when changes and upheavals seem
    to threaten organizations.
  • They guard the integrity and promote the growth of organizations.
  • I am committed to serving ACO in all three of these capacities — and to develop other leaders to do the same. But in order to meet these basic functions as a leader, I need to work on my own personal leadership.

Personal Leadership

Personal leadership, the ability and desire to focus our thinking and establish a specific direction for our life, takes determination. As coaches, we often facilitate our clients as they develop their personal leadership. We see them question, examine, and wrestle with themselves as their growth takes place. As we develop our personal leadership, we move more confidently down the path, knowing our guiding purpose and passions. We are able to keep the map in front of us, staying away from the potential pitfalls that distract us from our mission. Taking the journey of developing personal leadership, qualifies a person to become an effective organizational leader.

Developing my personal leadership has been an ongoing process – there always seems more to do. In preparation for becoming ACO’s president, I am

  • Creating guiding vision for my leadership, for the Board, for ACO.
  • Cultivating passion for our work, our field, our organization
  • Refining my integrity and the three essential parts of integrity: self-knowledge, candor,
    and maturity.

In doing this work, I hope to build the trust of board members and ACO members, and to lead the organization well.

I ask you to join me on this journey. Each of us, as leaders in the ADHD coaching community, needs to develop our personal leadership – and to lead in whatever spheres of influence we find ourselves. How will you plan your journey? What does your map look like?

As for ACO future, do you want to give me information, feedback, or advice? Are you interested in exploring what your leadership in ACO may look like? Contact me for a conversation.

Tamara Rosier, Ph.D.
President-Elect