UPDATE (October 2014): The IAAC has been formally dissolved as an organization. For information on ADHD Coach Certification, click here.

Part I in a Q & A from IAAC

These two articles will go into more depth about training requirements and includes other questions that are frequently asked about the subject.

What Training is Recognized by the IAAC for
an AD/HD Coaching Credential?
In a previous article about the Institute for the Advancement of AD/HD Coaching (IAAC) Credential training requirements, information was provided about the application of advanced training from a non-coach training organization, such as a graduate degree, certification in education, medical degree or doctorate. The reply explained that the training and experience in working with individuals with AD/HD in related fields will likely be helpful in understanding AD/HD; however, it does not meet the requirements set forth by the IAAC for coach specific training.
This article will go into more depth about training requirements and includes other questions that are frequently asked about the subject.
What kind of training program does the IAAC offer?
The IAAC is a credentialing body whose sole purpose it is to establish and maintain standards that will protect and promote the field of AD/HD Coaching.  As such, the Institute does not provide any general or AD/HD Coach training.  From time to time the Institute will offer teleclasses to provide information about the credentialing process, or to make available information about timely issues related to the field of AD/HD Coaching or about AD/HD specifically.
What coach training schools, programs or instructors do you recommend?
Recommending, accrediting or endorsing any one particular training school, organization, program or instructor over another is not within the mission of the Institute.  The IAAC Credentialing Commission has identified very specific training criteria that are detailed on the IAAC web site and in the copy that follows below.
Over the years many coach training schools have surfaced internationally. They appear in a variety of forms from a quick “2-days-to-certification” route, to a 2-year offering, with many in between. Some are industry accredited, or affiliated with certain associations or organizations, while others are independent. Some offer a certificate of completion based on testing, while others could be considered continuing education credits. Program content varies depending on the coaching focus such as life, career, personal, professional or AD/HD Coaching, with other specialties not mentioned in this article.
As with the selection of any training, it is incumbent upon the trainee to select the training program that best suits his/her needs.
The ACO (AD/HD Coach Organization) http://www.adhdcoaches.org/education/ provides a good listing of AD/HD coach training programs.
Mentor Coaching is required for the ACAC Path 2 credential.  What does that entail and who should I contact for my mentoring?
The focus of Mentor Coaching is to increase the individual’s coaching skills based on upholding IAAC Core Competencies and Code of Ethics, with a clear knowledge and understanding of the difference between coaching/mentoring/therapy/teaching and consulting.  This should assist the individual’s ability to confidently complete the live oral assessment exam required of this credential.
A qualified Mentor Coach will have attained a minimum of one of the following:
·        IAAC SCAC or CAC Credential, with 60 hours of general coach training; or
·        An advanced credential (e.g. PCC or MCC) or certification from a general coaching association or organization such as ICF, IAC, etc.
Arrangements for finding or securing a Mentor Coach will be between the two (2) parties without any involvement from the IAAC.
We welcome questions and/or comments about credentialing.  Look for more information about becoming an IAAC AD/HD Credentialed Coach by clicking on this link, http://bit.ly/7uz1EC, or by contacting Linda Taylor, the IAAC Credentialing Commissioner at ltaylor@adhdcoachinstitute.org.

Training and experience working with individuals with AD/HD in fields such as a graduate degree or certification in education, a medical degree or a doctorate will likely be helpful in understanding AD/HD; however, the requirements set forth by the IAAC for AD/HD coach specific training requires more than non-coach training. In a previously published article about the Institute for the Advancement of AD/HD Coaching (IAAC) credential training requirements, information was provided about the application of advanced training from a non-coach training organization.

Q – What kind of training program does the IAAC offer?

A -The IAAC is a credentialing body whose sole purpose it is to establish and maintain standards that will protect and promote the field of AD/HD Coaching.  As such, the Institute does not provide any general or AD/HD Coach training.  From time to time the Institute will offer teleclasses to provide information about the credentialing process, or to make available information about timely issues related to the field of AD/HD Coaching or about AD/HD specifically.

Q – What coach training schools, programs or instructors do you recommend?

A – Accrediting or endorsing any one particular training school, organization, program or instructor over another is not within the mission of the Institute.  The IAAC Credentialing Commission has identified very specific training criteria that are detailed on the IAAC web site and in the copy that follows below.

Over the years, many coach training schools have surfaced internationally. They appear in a variety of forms from a quick “2-days-to-certification” route, to a 2-year offering with many in between. Some are industry accredited or affiliated with certain associations or organizations, while others are independent. Some offer a certificate of completion based on testing, while others could be considered continuing education credits. Program content varies depending on the coaching focus such as life, career, personal, professional or AD/HD Coaching. As with the selection of any training, it is incumbent upon the trainee to select the training program that best suits his/her needs.

The ACO (AD/HD Coach Organization) http://www.adhdcoaches.org/education/ provides a good listing of AD/HD coach training programs.

Read in the February Circle about Mentor Coaching for IAAC credentialing.